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From the Jewish HeartlandTwo Centuries of Midwest Foodways$
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Ellen F. Steinberg and Jack H. Prost

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036200

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036200.001.0001

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Jews in Small Towns, on the Farms, and In-Between

Jews in Small Towns, on the Farms, and In-Between

Chapter:
(p.60) 4 Jews in Small Towns, on the Farms, and In-Between
Source:
From the Jewish Heartland
Author(s):

Ellen F. Steinberg

Jack H. Prost

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036200.003.0005

This chapter focuses on Eastern European Jewish settlers in the Midwest. Eastern European Jews left their homes, crossing vast expanses of terrain in all kinds of weather, heading for a harbor where they could board a ship to take them to America. While majority headed straight for urban centers, a smaller number of Jewish immigrants headed toward America's less congested towns and cities. The mass migration that began in 1881 affected the makeup of America's major Jewish centers almost immediately, but it took perhaps a decade, and sometimes longer, for East Europeans to begin arriving in smaller cities and towns in significant numbers. The German-Jews, although somewhat ambivalent toward these newcomers, rallied to provide whatever support they could—money, food, clothing, English lessons, citizenship and cooking classes.

Keywords:   American Midwest, Eastern European Jews, mass migration, German-Jews, Jewish immigrants

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