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Demanding Child CareWomen's Activism and the Politics of Welfare, 1940-1971$
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Natalie M. Fousekis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036255

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036255.001.0001

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A Different Kind of Welfare State

A Different Kind of Welfare State

California’s Child Care Coalition in the Age of Protest, 1966–71

Chapter:
(p.141) 6 A Different Kind of Welfare State
Source:
Demanding Child Care
Author(s):

Natalie M. Fousekis

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036255.003.0007

This chapter looks at the new voices that began speaking for child care, both in California and across the nation: black mothers in the welfare rights movement and white middle-class women in the feminist movement. While black and white poor mothers organized in CPACC and around welfare rights, a more visible women's movement developed among predominantly the white middle class. In 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) emerged out of frustration over the government's unwillingness to enforce Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which made discrimination by sex as well as by race illegal. With seasoned women's rights, labor feminists, and a few black women at its helm, NOW quickly moved to the forefront of the struggle for women's equality.

Keywords:   child care, black mothers, welfare rights movement, white women, middle-class women, feminist movement, National Organization for Women, labor feminists, women's equality

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