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Becoming Ray Bradbury$
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Jonathan R. Eller

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036293

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 September 2017

The Road to Autumn’s House

The Road to Autumn’s House

Chapter:
(p.93) 15 The Road to Autumn’s House
Source:
Becoming Ray Bradbury
Author(s):

Jonathan R. Eller

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.003.0016

This chapter examines Ray Bradbury's creativity and publishing record in two niche market genres—weird and the detective fiction—during the war years as his maturing process, both self-taught and mentored, continued. It begins with a discussion of Bradbury's relationship with the editors and publishers of Weird Tales and the frustrations he experienced as he sought to have his weird fiction printed. It then considers Bradbury's venture into detective fiction following the wartime suspension or outright demise of a number of pulp magazines catering to fantasy and science fiction, successfully placing several stories in Detective Tales, New Detective, and Dime Mystery. Under Julius Schwartz's entrepreneurial stewardship, at least thirty-eight Bradbury short stories from this period circulated, but failed to sell.

Keywords:   detective fiction, Ray Bradbury, creativity, publishing, weird fiction, Weird Tales, short stories, science fiction, Julius Schwartz, pulp magazines

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