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Becoming Ray Bradbury$
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Jonathan R. Eller

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036293

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.001.0001

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From Arkham to New York

From Arkham to New York

Chapter:
(p.135) 23 From Arkham to New York
Source:
Becoming Ray Bradbury
Author(s):

Jonathan R. Eller

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.003.0024

This chapter focuses on Ray Bradbury's trip to New York in 1946 where he met with various magazine editors and book publishers with the help of Don Congdon. Throughout 1946, Bradbury had to navigate the increasingly complicated process of bringing Dark Carnival to publication. August Derleth had originally expected to list Bradbury's first book as an Arkham House release for the summer or fall of 1946, but Bradbury's continuing revisions pushed the actual publication date to May 1947. This chapter discusses Bradbury's time in New York and the magazine editors and book publishers he met there, including Innes MacCammond, John Shaffner of Good Housekeeping, Charles Addams and Sam Cobean, Frederic Danay, and Paul Payne of Fiction House. It also describes Bradbury's first face-to-face meeting with Jack Snow, a promotional writer at NBC radio.

Keywords:   magazine editors, Ray Bradbury, New York, book publishers, Don Congdon, Dark Carnival, August Derleth, Arkham House, Innes MacCammond, Jack Snow

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