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Becoming Ray Bradbury$
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Jonathan R. Eller

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036293

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.001.0001

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New Worlds: Graphic and Television Adaptations

New Worlds: Graphic and Television Adaptations

Chapter:
(p.240) 39 New Worlds: Graphic and Television Adaptations
Source:
Becoming Ray Bradbury
Author(s):

Jonathan R. Eller

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.003.0040

This chapter focuses on graphic and television adaptations of some of Ray Bradbury's science fiction stories in the 1950s. Bookstores continued to provide a favorite recreation for Bradbury. He and his wife Maggie were beginning to buy more books for their home library. His newer reading discoveries now included the works of Sean O'Casey, Luigi Pirandello, and Marcel Aymé. This expansion of Bradbury's reading favorites coincided with the opportunity to extend his rather limited interaction with the world of television and film. Perhaps the most significant event of 1951 for Bradbury was a dinner with John Huston. This chapter examines graphic adaptations of Bradbury stories, including comic strips that were possible “lifts,” as well as television adaptations such as the broadcast of “Zero Hour” on NBC's Lights Out and Sidney Lumet's direction of “The Rocket” for CBS Television Workshop. It also discusses the problem of rights over many Bradbury pulp stories sold during the early and mid-1940s that complicated negotiations for other deals.

Keywords:   graphic adaptations, television adaptations, Ray Bradbury, science fiction, reading, John Huston, comic strips, Zero Hour, Sidney Lumet, The Rocket

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