Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
We Are the UnionDemocratic Unionism and Dissent at Boeing$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dana L. Cloud

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036378

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036378.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 September 2017

Business Unionism and Rank-and-File Unionism at the Turn of the Millennium

Business Unionism and Rank-and-File Unionism at the Turn of the Millennium

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 Business Unionism and Rank-and-File Unionism at the Turn of the Millennium
Source:
We Are the Union
Author(s):

Dana L. Cloud

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036378.003.0002

This chapter introduces the arguments of the book in the context of a summary of the critique of traditional American union leadership as pro-business and dangerously invested in partnerships with management. First, it chronicles the two waves of the American union movement, telling the story of the rise of democratic unionism with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and its subsequent decline in the postwar years. It then provides some examples from the 1990s and 2000s of instances in which conservative unions led workers to defeats, primarily because of the failure to prioritize rank-and-file action in favor of more administrative, legalistic, and consumer-oriented strategies. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the changing situation of labor today. It argues that that the story of the rise of the CIO provides an inspiring model of the birth of a fighting labor movement out of a period of fragmentation, exclusivity, and weakness in existing labor institutions. It further suggests that present conditions of economic crisis and the stirrings of a new militancy are ripe for a similar transformation.

Keywords:   American union leadership, labor unions, democratic unionism, Congress of Industrial Organizations, CIO, union movement

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.