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Gleanings of FreedomFree and Slave Labor along the Mason-Dixon Line, 1790-1860$
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Max Grivno

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036521

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036521.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Sharpsburg, Maryland, 1862

Chapter:
(p.195) Conclusion
Source:
Gleanings of Freedom
Author(s):

Max Grivno

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036521.003.0007

This concluding chapter examines the interplay among the multiple boundaries between slavery and freedom. Northern Marylanders lived on slavery's tattered margin, a circumstance that profoundly influenced how workers experienced both slavery and free labor. Not all of the forces shaping the fault lines were local. Northern Maryland was part of a slaveholding state whose legal and political apparatuses were forged by and for Chesapeake planters. Moreover, residents of the area were inextricably linked to the vibrant slave societies developing along the South's cotton frontier. The tangled intersection where labor systems collided and where local and national forces converged was the setting where the slavery–free labor boundary emerged.

Keywords:   slavery, freedom, Maryland, slave societies, slaveholding state, labor systems, free labor

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