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Africans to Spanish AmericaExpanding the Diaspora$
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Sherwin K. Bryant and Rachel Sarah O'Toole

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036637

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036637.001.0001

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The African American Experience in Comparative Perspective

The African American Experience in Comparative Perspective

The Current Question of the Debate

Chapter:
(p.206) 9 The African American Experience in Comparative Perspective
Source:
Africans to Spanish America
Author(s):

Herbert S. Klein

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036637.003.0009

This chapter examines the comparative differences and similarities between slave regimes in the Americas and how those differences influenced the post-manumission integration of Africans. In particular, it considers some of the methods and questions that animated the comparative slavery school as well as the implications of junking the comparative model. The chapter first highlights the social, economic, and political consequences of differences among slave regimes in the Americas for African Americans before proposing a research agenda for fourth-wave scholars that expands the scope of analysis of Afro-Latin America beyond the frame of slavery to include fuller explications of free black life. Several areas worth investigating are discussed, including the economic role of slaves and the human capital they accumulated under slavery; the rate and importance of manumission as well as the legal and effective support given to it by the slave-owning elite; the role of the free colored class well before final slave emancipation; and the attitude of elite toward slavery, slaves, and free blacks.

Keywords:   slavery, Americas, comparative slavery, African Americans, Afro-Latin America, slaves, manumission, slave regime, free blacks

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