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Illinois in the War of 1812$
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Gillum Ferguson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036743

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036743.001.0001

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Peoria

Peoria

Chapter:
(p.79) Five Peoria
Source:
Illinois in the War of 1812
Author(s):

Gillum Ferguson

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036743.003.0005

This chapter explores how Governor Ninian Edwards began to prepare a counterstroke as the Indians' offensive of August and September 1812 stalled and receded. The natural target was Peoria, where hostile Indians—Kickapoo, Potawatomi, and Piankashaw—were gathered in large numbers, and from which they had just launched their abortive raid on the settlements. Lacking assistance from outside the territory, Edwards would have to rely on the territory's own resources, which were very slender. The governor estimated that there were no more than 2,000 adult white males scattered between the Mississippi and the Wabash, while more than 1,000 Indian warriors could assemble at Peoria within a matter of days. None of the militiamen who had defended the territory during the spring and summer had been paid, and to obtain volunteers, Edwards was forced to pledge his own resources to guarantee payment.

Keywords:   Peoria, Governor Ninian Edwards, Indians, Kickapoo, Potawatomi, Piankashaw, Indian warriors, militiamen

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