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Illinois in the War of 1812$
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Gillum Ferguson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036743

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036743.001.0001

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Clark

Clark

Chapter:
(p.147) Nine Clark
Source:
Illinois in the War of 1812
Author(s):

Gillum Ferguson

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036743.003.0009

This chapter focuses on William Clark, who replaced Brigadier General Benjamin Howard in command at Saint Louis. Major General William Henry Harrison suggested Clark, whom he knew from the days when they had both served under “Mad Anthony” Wayne. Son of a prominent Virginia family, and the younger brother of George Rogers Clark—the conqueror of Kaskaskia and Vincennes—William had followed his elder brother into the army. William was already experienced in Indian warfare when he commanded a column of riflemen at the battle of Fallen Timbers (1794), and the next year he was present when the Treaty of Greenville brought the Indian war to a close. After the treaty, Clark resigned from the army and occupied himself with his private affairs until Meriwether Lewis suggested him as joint commander of the Corps of Discovery.

Keywords:   William Clark, Brigadier General Benjamin Howard, Major General William Henry Harrison, Mad Anthony Wayne, George Rogers Clark, Treaty of Greenville, Corps of Discovery

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