Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
New German Dance Studies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Susan Manning and Lucia Ruprecht

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036767

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036767.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 September 2017

Back Again? Valeska Gert’s Exiles

Back Again? Valeska Gert’s Exiles

Chapter:
(p.113) 7. Back Again? Valeska Gert’s Exiles
Source:
New German Dance Studies
Author(s):

Kate Elswit

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036767.003.0008

This chapter questions what exile means for an artist whose performances relied on a strategy of estrangement. In so doing, it follows Valeska Gert (1892–1978) through her American exile and back to Germany, exploring the shifting dynamics of her reception abroad and upon her return to a very changed homeland. Gert came into the public eye as a soloist in the late teens, touring mostly through Germany but also abroad during the Weimar Republic. From 1933 to 1938, Gert appeared in European cities, including London, Paris, Budapest, Krakow, and Prague, as well as in New York. In 1939 she emigrated to the United States and eventually ran one of the more successful exile cabarets in New York from 1941 to 1945, named the Beggar Bar. After the Beggar Bar closed for licensing problems, she decided to return to Germany.

Keywords:   Valeska Gert, female dancers, exile, Weimar Republic, Germany

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.