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Child Care in Black and WhiteWorking Parents and the History of Orphanages$

Jessie B. Ramey

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036903

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036903.001.0001

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(p.245) Bibliography

(p.245) Bibliography

Source:
Child Care in Black and White
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press

Archival Collections

Library and Archives Division, Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania (HSWP), Senator John Heinz History Center: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Home for Colored Children (HCC) records, Three Rivers Youth (TRY) collection

Mary Hogg Brunot records, Papers of the Hogg Family, 1785–1914, collection

Women’s Christian Association (WCA) annual reports (1877–1879), Annual Reports collection

YWCA records, Young Women’s Christian Association of Greater Pittsburgh Records, 1875–1988 collection

Mars Home for Youth (MHY): Mars, Pennsylvania

Allegheny Day Nursery collection

United Presbyterian Orphan’s Home (UPOH) collection

United Presbyterian Women’s Association of North America (UPWANA) collection

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (CLP): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Biography Card Catalog, reference index: Pennsylvania Room

Charles Avery records, digital collection (www.clpgh.org/exhibit.neighborhoods/northside/nor_n110.html)

“Historic Women of Pennsylvania and Prominent Women of Contemporary Pittsburgh,” 1932–1942, reference index: Pennsylvania Room

1904 Social Register of Pittsburgh: Pennsylvania Room

Orphanage Directory for Allegheny County, digital collection (http://www.clpgh.org/locations/pennsylvania/orphanages/dir.html)

Women’s Christian Association (WCA) annual reports (1875–1876) in Institutional Records collection: Pennsylvania Room

YWCA files in Institutional Records collection: Pennsylvania Room

Historic Pittsburgh digital library (digital.library.pitt.edu/pittsburgh)

G. M. Hopkins Company Maps, Maps collection

(p.246) Ancestry.com (wwww.ancestry.com)

Mary S. Fulton records, Shafer Family collection

United States Census records (1850–1930), U.S. Census collection

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