Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Chicago Skyscrapers, 1871-1934$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thomas Leslie

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037542

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037542.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Steel and Wind: The Braced Frame, 1890–1897

Steel and Wind: The Braced Frame, 1890–1897

Chapter:
(p.61) Chapter 4 Steel and Wind: The Braced Frame, 1890–1897
Source:
Chicago Skyscrapers, 1871-1934
Author(s):

Thomas Leslie

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037542.003.0004

This chapter describes major structures built from 1890 to 1897, many of which featured wind-braced frames that used steel to reduce spatially inefficient masonry walls and piers. Before the late nineteenth century, wind bracing had rarely been more than a minor consideration in structural calculations—the dead weight of brick or stone construction could absorb all but the most severe wind forces. However, the lighter weight of skeletal buildings, their increased height, and the unreliable nature of iron connections brought this issue to the fore. Chicago's tall building designers of the 1880s were among the first to recognize this problem and to solve it with dedicated lateral-resistant systems.

Keywords:   Chicago, building construction, wind-braced frames, steel, masonry, wind bracing

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.