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PalominoClinton Jencks and Mexican-American Unionism in the American Southwest$
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James J. Lorence and Donna Lorence

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037559

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037559.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

The Moment of Decision

The Moment of Decision

The Empire Zinc Strike, Grassroots Feminism, and Mexican American Liberation, 1950–1953

Chapter:
(p.91) Chapter 6 The Moment of Decision
Source:
Palomino
Author(s):

James J. Lorence

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037559.003.0006

This chapter explains how Empire Zinc acted out of fear that a successful strike might enhance the Mexican American unity already encouraged by the policies Jencks had encouraged Local 890 to adopt. The genius of democratic unionism was the empowerment of local union members and their community, which encouraged an immediate and vigorous response to the company's refusal to negotiate. Once the strike began, local committees were created with responsibility for various functions, including relief, negotiations, publicity, police relations, and fund-raising. As the community mobilized, it became clear that the great union advantage was to be its human resources, organizational capacities, and wide-ranging ability to employ external support in both the union family and the Mexican American community.

Keywords:   Empire Zinc, Mexican American unity, Clinton Jencks, Local 890, democratic unionism, community mobilization, human resources

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