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PalominoClinton Jencks and Mexican-American Unionism in the American Southwest$
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James J. Lorence and Donna Lorence

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037559

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037559.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Telling the Story

Telling the Story

Salt of the Earth as a Medium of Communication

Chapter:
(p.113) Chapter 7 Telling the Story
Source:
Palomino
Author(s):

James J. Lorence

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037559.003.0007

This chapter examines how Jencks' reassignment in 1951 to service Clifton-Morenci from his Silver City base resulted in a substantial disruption of their home life and normal work routines. For Virginia, this change threatened an especially devastating blow, since it became clear that she was expected to follow her husband wherever his duties took him. Although Virginia was fully aware of union spouses' acceptance of subordinate roles, she considered Mine-Mill's relegation of her work to the status of helpmate altogether “unpalatable.” Furthermore, one major challenge Jencks and Local 890 faced in the early 1950s involved continued Red-baiting in loose coordination with ongoing steelworkers' raiding of Mine-Mill jurisdictions.

Keywords:   Clinton Jencks, Virginia Jencks, Clifton-Moreci, Local 890, union spouse, Red-baiting, Mine-Mill jurisdictions

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