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Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age$
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Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Anna Romina Guevarra, and Maura Toro-Morn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037573

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

Extending Kinship

Extending Kinship

Mexicana Elder Care Providers and Their Wards

Chapter:
(p.186) 10 Extending Kinship
Source:
Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age
Author(s):

María de la Luz Ibarra

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.003.0011

This chapter examines private elder care in a broader context of constructed kinship relations by focusing on Mexicana elder care workers in Santa Barbara, California. More specifically, it considers the case study of Cecilia Ramos, a worker who forms part of a family care group and who literally and figuratively “extends” kinship to her ward. Before discussing Cecilia's case, the chapter provides an overview of the evolving range of elder care in Santa Barbara. It also reviews the literature on domestic work and the role that personalism continues to play within the occupation, especially as it pertains to workers' expressed desires for closer “family” relations with their employers. It concludes by showing that, in the case of Cecilia, “extending” kinship assumes two meanings. First, she literally extends her own close kin relations into the workplace and facilitates friendships among her biological female kin and her ward. Second, Cecilia commits herself and her family to provide care until her ward dies.

Keywords:   private elder care, kinship relations, Mexicana care workers, Santa Barbara, domestic work, personalism, friendships, family relations

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