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Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age$
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Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Anna Romina Guevarra, and Maura Toro-Morn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037573

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Gendered Labor

Gendered Labor

Experiences of Nepali Women within Pan-Ethnic Informal Labor Markets in Boston and New York

Chapter:
(p.81) 4 Gendered Labor
Source:
Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age
Author(s):

Shobha Hamal Gurung

Bandana Purkayastha

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.003.0005

This chapter examines how contemporary globalization has created gendered labor by drawing on the experiences of Nepali immigrant women within pan-ethnic informal labor markets in Boston and New York City. After a brief overview of the existing theoretical framework, the chapter presents data on Nepali women's experiences in the informal economy. It shows how the economic opportunities available to these women are shaped by within-ethnic-group social location—Nepali Americans' social location in relation to wealthier Indian Americans (and their religious and linguistic similarity to this group). It also considers how some Nepali women, especially those who worked in the formal sector in Nepal, have begun to “bank” their social capital in their home countries. The Nepali women's experiences highlight the segmentation of the informal labor market for care work and suggest that, while they send remittances back to their home countries, some of this money is sent to nonfamily members.

Keywords:   globalization, gendered labor, Nepali immigrant women, informal labor markets, Boston, New York City, social location, social capital, care work, remittances

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