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Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age$
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Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Anna Romina Guevarra, and Maura Toro-Morn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037573

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

Living the Third Shift

Living the Third Shift

Latina Adolescent Street Vendors in Los Angeles

Chapter:
(p.144) 8 Living the Third Shift
Source:
Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age
Author(s):

Emir Estrada

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037573.003.0009

This chapter examines gendered expectations resulting not only from the intersecting relations of race and class but also from the age as well as the inequality of nations that gives rise to particular patterns of international labor migration. Drawing on nine months of ethnographic observations and twenty in-depth interviews with Latina/o adolescent street vendors (sixteen girls and four boys) in Los Angeles, the chapter investigates how Latina girls negotiate a triple shift: street vending, household work, and schoolwork. It also explores the continuities between gendered household divisions of labor and street vending, whether the girls see “third-shift” work obligations as a burden or as a source of empowerment, and how the work that girls do as street vendors both perpetuates and challenges gendered expectations.

Keywords:   gendered expectations, race, international labor migration, Los Angeles, Latina girls, street vending, household work, schoolwork, gendered divisions, adolescent street vendors

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