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Fighting from a DistanceHow Filipino Exiles Helped Topple a Dictator$
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Jose V. Fuentecilla

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037580

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037580.001.0001

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A Man for Many Seasons

A Man for Many Seasons

The Leader Who Led the Movement

Chapter:
(p.101) Chapter 13 A Man for Many Seasons
Source:
Fighting from a Distance
Author(s):

Jose V. Fuentecilla

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037580.003.0013

This chapter focuses on Raul Manglapus. Manglapus was an involuntary detainee in the United States as a self-exile—thirteen years, five months, and seven days by his count, beginning in 1972, when by sheer luck he found himself in America the day before martial law clamped down on the Philippines. Officially, at least, four court charges had been filed against him during his exile years, including subversion, rebellion, and plotting to kill Marcos and his wife. If he had returned, there is no doubt that he would have been hauled off to jail as soon as he stepped out of the plane. He had left behind an outstanding career that was cut short. Those who speculated about what he might have accomplished in his country without Marcos referred to his impressive record as a legislator and public servant. As head of the main exile opposition group, Manglapus had to deal with the challenges of a new leadership role. As a seasoned politician back home, he possessed the skills to respond to his constituents, both local and national. But in the United States, the tactics needed to win over Congress and the Filipino residents required a different set of skills.

Keywords:   Raul Manglapus, political exile, political activists, anti-martial law, anti-Marcos

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