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In Defense of JusticeJoseph Kurihara and the Japanese American Struggle for Equality$
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Eileen H. Tamura

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037788

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037788.001.0001

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Resistance in Manzanar

Resistance in Manzanar

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 4 Resistance in Manzanar
Source:
In Defense of Justice
Author(s):

Eileen H. Tamura

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037788.003.0005

This chapter details Kurihara's incarceration. Kurihara was among the Nikkei assigned to Manzanar, one of ten concentration camps for Nikkei, citizens and alien residents alike. Located at the base of the Sierra Nevada in eastern California, Manzanar was in a desert land of extreme temperatures, high winds, and harsh climate. On June 1, 1942, the army's WCCA, which had been running Manzanar, turned over its administration of the camp to a civilian agency, the War Relocation Authority (WRA). Six months after the WRA took control of Manzanar, the camp experienced a revolt that ended in the death of two innocent young men, shaking the confidence of administrators and the sense of security of the inmates. But long before that explosion of hostility, there had been strong undercurrents of resentment at Manzanar that went back ultimately to the frustrations of Nikkei rooted in the long history of discrimination they had endured, especially in California.

Keywords:   Nikkei, Manzanar, concentration camps, War Relocation Authority, revolt, discrimination

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