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In Defense of JusticeJoseph Kurihara and the Japanese American Struggle for Equality$
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Eileen H. Tamura

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037788

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037788.001.0001

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Isolating Citizen Dissidents

Isolating Citizen Dissidents

Chapter:
(p.81) Chapter 6 Isolating Citizen Dissidents
Source:
In Defense of Justice
Author(s):

Eileen H. Tamura

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037788.003.0007

This chapter details Kurihara's time in the Moab isolation camp. After their arrest in the wake of the Manzanar revolt, Kurihara and the other members of the Committee of Five were taken to the jail in Bishop, and after a few days, to Lone Pine. Their prosecution was held at bay, however, since WRA officials were able to secure a temporary isolation camp near the town of Moab, Utah. The Moab camp was designed specifically for Nisei, who, as U.S. citizens, could not be transferred to the enemy alien internment camps operated by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Within several months after the Manzanar sixteen had entered the Moab camp, other dissidents arrived from the Gila, Manzanar, and Tule Lake camps. No formal charges were made against any of these men either. Rather, they were sent at the discretion of the WRA camp project directors.

Keywords:   Moab isolation camp, Manzanar revolt, Committee of Five, Nisei, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Manzanar sixteen

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