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Along the Streets of BronzevilleBlack Chicago's Literary Landscape$
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Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037825

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037825.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.118) Conclusion
Source:
Along the Streets of Bronzeville
Author(s):

Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037825.003.0006

This concluding chapter evaluates Bronzeville's and the Chicago Black Renaissance's narrative of decline. It argues that the experience of Bronzeville's residents during this period was not one of unmitigated triumph followed by unfortunate demise; instead it was a contradictory blend of expansion, progress, and stagnation. From 1910 to 1950, neighborhood residents produced and witnessed a remarkable growth in cultural, economic, and political institutions designed to serve their growing needs. Thus, the history of the neighborhood is a conflicting mixture of opportunity and subjugation. As an ending note, the chapter comes to terms with the actual existing economic, political, and cultural relations of the period, showing how the once vibrant neighborhood succumbed to the pressures of segregation and economic disparity.

Keywords:   Bronzeville, Chicago Black Renaissance, segregation, economic disparity, stagnation

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