Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Demilitarization in the Contemporary World$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Stearns

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037894

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037894.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Demilitarization after Central American Civil Wars

Demilitarization after Central American Civil Wars

Chapter:
(p.216) 9 Demilitarization after Central American Civil Wars
Source:
Demilitarization in the Contemporary World
Author(s):

Philip J. Williams

J. Mark Ruhl

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037894.003.0010

This chapter considers how the armed forces declined in power throughout Latin America in the early 1990s, but the processes of demilitarization in El Salvador and Guatemala were unique. While demilitarization followed civil wars in El Salvador and Guatemala, these are the only two cases in Latin America in which the United Nations played a major role in brokering negotiated settlements to end the armed conflicts and in monitoring peace agreements that set in motion processes of demilitarization. In both countries political opposition to continued military domination, including armed insurgencies, was a constant feature from the 1960s onward. Moreover, economic elites who traditionally looked to the military to protect their business interests increasingly expressed concern about the liability of supporting a large, well-equipped military without a mission.

Keywords:   demilitarization, El Salvador, Guatemala, armed forces, Latin America, United Nations, peace agreements, armed insurgencies, economic elites

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.