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Gendered ResistanceWomen, Slavery, and the Legacy of Margaret Garner$
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Mary E. Frederickson and Delores M. Walters

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037900

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037900.001.0001

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Resurrecting Chica da Silva

Resurrecting Chica da Silva

Gender, Race, and Nation in Brazilian Popular Culture

Chapter:
(p.171) Chapter 8 Resurrecting Chica da Silva
Source:
Gendered Resistance
Author(s):

Raquel L. de Souza

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037900.003.0009

This chapter details the resistance of Chica da Silva. Chica was an enslaved woman born in eighteenth-century Brazil who obtained manumission and socioeconomic ascendance through her involvement with a very wealthy Portuguese man who was sent to the interior of the State of Minas Gerais to oversee the exploration of diamond mines. Chica guaranteed her survival and the well-being of her offspring through her association with the diamond contractor. Faced with few alternatives for economic stability, her association with a “benefactor” might still be interpreted as a choice to commodify her body. However, Chica's resistance to subjugation warrants a more complex assessment.

Keywords:   Chica da Silva, Brazil, economic stability, socioeconomic ascendance, body commodification, subjugation

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