Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Black RevolutionaryWilliam Patterson and the Globalization of the African American Freedom Struggle$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gerald Horne

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037924

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037924.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

The Road to Revolution

The Road to Revolution

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 The Road to Revolution
Source:
Black Revolutionary
Author(s):

Gerald Horne

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037924.003.0001

This chapter presents a biography of Patterson and looks at his road to revolution. By 1923, Patterson became a named partner in what became New York City's leading Negro law firm, Dyett, Hall, and Patterson. In 1926, he made official what some assumed was the case—he joined the Communist party—though an epochal event the following year led to his making this political decision, a career choice to become a professional revolutionary. He then left his law firm, instead devoting his life to the Communist party and its idea of a step-by-step drive to socialist revolution, paved all the way by one democratic advance after another—as demonstrated in the first major instance by the Scottsboro case. Soon he could be found at the subway entrance at 135th Street and Lenox Avenue, selling the CP newspaper. He also began participating in street-corner meetings and distribution of leaflets, and he attended classes at the party school.

Keywords:   Negro law firm, Communist party, socialist revolution, democratic advance, Scottsboro case

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.