Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Hear Our TruthsThe Creative Potential of Black Girlhood$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ruth Nicole Brown

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037979

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037979.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

More than Sass or Silence

More than Sass or Silence

The Creative Potential of Black Girlhood

Chapter:
(p.184) 5 More than Sass or Silence
Source:
Hear Our Truths
Author(s):

Ruth Nicole Brown

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037979.003.0006

This chapter presents a soundtrack of Black girls' expressive culture as ethnographically documented in SOLHOT in the form of original music. To think through the more dominant categorizations of how Black girls are heard, as both sassy and silent, this chapter samples Andrea Smith's (2006) “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy: Rethinking Women of Color Organizing” to offer a new frame called “The Creative Potential of Black Girlhood.” Music made from conversations in SOLHOT is used to emphasize how three logics of the creative potential framework, including volume/oppression, swagg/surveillance, and booty/capitalism, amplifies Black girls' critical thought to document the often overlooked creative process of Black girl music making, demonstrate how hip-hop feminist sensibilities inform girls' studies, and, most importantly, move those who do Black girl organizing toward a wider repertoire of actions and conversations that affirm differences among Black girls and differently sounding Black girl knowledge.

Keywords:   Black girls, expressive culture, volume, oppression, surveillance, capitalism, swagg, music making, hip-hop, booty

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.