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Caribbean SpacesEscapes from Twilight Zones$
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Carole Boyce Davies

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038020

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038020.001.0001

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Between the Twilight Zone and the Underground Railroad

Between the Twilight Zone and the Underground Railroad

“Owagea”

Chapter:
(p.19) 1 Between the Twilight Zone and the Underground Railroad
Source:
Caribbean Spaces
Author(s):

Carole Boyce Davies

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038020.003.0002

This chapter sets up the discussion of “twilight zones.” Twilight refers to that space of unreality between night and day, where spirits begin to roam and objects that seem perfectly normal in the daylight assume strange patterns and shapes, that gap between different realities, that zone of instability between darkness and light, that time when transformation happens. The author begins by describing how she found herself lost, one rainy night, amid the emptiness and sameness of the buildings and the depressed grayness in the area around Antique Row on Clinton Street in Binghamton, New York. Warehouses from a bustling past of economic vitality either remained empty or hosted quaint antique shops, making the best of postindustrial depression. Driving off the highway, she takes a wrong turn and somehow ends up on a back street. Not sure which direction would take her to Main Street, she panics, observing the strange shapes that meander like ghosts.

Keywords:   Caribbean culture, twilight zones, personal narratives, Binghamton

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