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Loyalty and LibertyAmerican Countersubversion from World War I to the McCarthy Era$
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Alex Goodall

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038037

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038037.001.0001

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Troubled Spirits

Troubled Spirits

Christianity and Antiradicalism

Chapter:
(p.151) 7 Troubled Spirits
Source:
Loyalty and Liberty
Author(s):

Alex Goodall

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038037.003.0008

This chapter illustrates how reincarnation provided Henry Ford with a sense of purpose he could find only in an absolute order generated by a coherent structure underpinning the universe. According to him, the eternal animating spirit was something like a “Queen Bee in the complicated hive which constitutes the individual.” These beliefs have since become part of the mythology surrounding America's most famous industrial pioneer. A shared hostility to radical politics was a central part of the process by which the alliance of church and industry was cemented. Antiradical ethics expressed a point where religious and corporate conceptions of the good seemingly came together, since Bolsheviks challenged the established norms both of this world and the next.

Keywords:   Henry Ford, reincarnation, absolute order, eternal animating spirit, radical politics, antiradical ethics, Bolsheviks

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