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Doing Emotions History$
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Susan J. Matt and Peter N. Stearns

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038051

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038051.001.0001

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The Skein of Chinese Emotions History

The Skein of Chinese Emotions History

Chapter:
(p.57) Chapter 3 The Skein of Chinese Emotions History
Source:
Doing Emotions History
Author(s):

Norman Kutcher

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038051.003.0004

This chapter draws out some common threads from the history of emotions in Chinese literature. The first of these threads is orthodoxy. Specific Chinese traditions—and here Confucianism is the case in point—dictated the rules of proper behavior: these rules were considered to regulate even the emotions. The second thread is context. Whether, or how, an emotion was expressed was a product of the venue (textual or otherwise) in which it was to be described or expressed. The third thread is the role of the formula (or, the formulaic) in emotion and its expression, or how we understand professions and descriptions of emotion that are expressed via stock phrases.

Keywords:   Chinese emotions, orthodoxy, Confucianism, Chinese literature, formula, formulaic expressions, stock phrases

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