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Eating Her Curries and KwayA Cultural History of Food in Singapore$
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Nicole Tarulevicz

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038099

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038099.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 July 2018

Jam Tarts, Spotted Dicks, and Curry

Jam Tarts, Spotted Dicks, and Curry

Chapter:
(p.77) 5 Jam Tarts, Spotted Dicks, and Curry
Source:
Eating Her Curries and Kway
Author(s):

Nicole Tarulevicz

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038099.003.0006

This chapter discusses how Singaporean and Malayan cookbooks produced from 1880 to 2008 were intended to inculcate a racial and social hierarchy. A 1960s cookbook based on the Malayan school curriculum, for example, states that the text is intended to “foster and develop those natural attributes of good craftsmanship and artistry posed by all Malayans.” In the cooking of jam tarts, boiled potatoes, royal icing, coddled eggs, and scones, it seems that Malayan artistry had a clearly British framing. Through educational materials, the colonial authorities, followed by the Singaporean government, used the domestic sphere to establish specific gender and racial constructions; to make rules. Moreover, they sought to imagine, and thereby define, the nation in alignment with the agendas of the elites.

Keywords:   Singaporean cookbooks, Malayan cookbooks, racial hierarchy, social hierarchy, Singaporean government

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