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Kiss the Blood Off My HandsOn Classic Film Noir$
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Robert Miklitsch

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038594

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038594.001.0001

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Refuge England

Refuge England

Blacklisted American Directors and ’50s British Noir

(p.152) 8 Refuge England
Kiss the Blood Off My Hands

Robert Murphy

University of Illinois Press

This chapter traces the contributions of four directors to 1950s British noir: Edward Dmytryk, Jules Dassin, Cy Endfiled, and Joseph Losey. While Dmytryk and Dassin found success in the United States in the 1940s with a series of classic noirs, after being blacklisted, both directors were forced to expatriate to Great Britain where they helmed pictures inspired by specifically British elements—the serial killer and postwar, bombed-out London. Unlike Dmytryk and Dassin, Endfield and Losey sought political refuge in England for an extended period in the 1950s, during which they made a number of “noir-inflected melodramas” that brilliantly capture the haunted psyches of these exiled American filmmakers.

Keywords:   British noir, Edward Dmytryk, Jules Dassin, Cy Endfiled, Joseph Losey, classic noir, noir-inflected melodramas, American filmmakers

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