Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From ScratchWritings in Music Theory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Tenney, Larry Polansky, and Lauren Pratt

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038723

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038723.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 October 2017

On the Development of the Structural Potentialities of Rhythm, Dynamics, and Timbre in the Early Nontonal Music of Arnold Schoenberg

On the Development of the Structural Potentialities of Rhythm, Dynamics, and Timbre in the Early Nontonal Music of Arnold Schoenberg

(1959)

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 On the Development of the Structural Potentialities of Rhythm, Dynamics, and Timbre in the Early Nontonal Music of Arnold Schoenberg
Source:
From Scratch
Author(s):

James Tenney

, Larry Polansky, Lauren Pratt, Robert Wannamaker, Michael Winter
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038723.003.0001

In this essay, James Tenney discusses the development of the structural potentialities of rhythm, dynamics, and timbre in the early nontonal music of Arnold Schoenberg. Beginning with the Three Piano Pieces op. 11, and continuing through Pierrot Lunaire and the Four Songs with Orchestra opp. 21 and 22, Schoenberg developed a style that he later characterized as one based on “the emancipation of the dissonance.” His further descriptions of the developments of the period are almost exclusively in terms of harmonic innovations. Analytical writings by others have reflected this same concern with the harmonic (and, to a lesser extent, the melodic) aspects of the music. Tenney considers the twelve-tone method in music and argues that it is a partial systematization of procedures that Schoenberg had used. He hopes that his observations on rhythm, dynamics, and timbre that are articulated in this essay might later serve as the basis for a broader generalization of the basic ideas underlying twelve-tone music.

Keywords:   rhythm, James Tenney, dynamics, timbre, nontonal music, Arnold Schoenberg, dissonance, harmonic innovation, twelve-tone music

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.