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Digital DepressionInformation Technology and Economic Crisis$
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Dan Schiller

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038761

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038761.001.0001

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Networked Militarization

Networked Militarization

(p.57) Chapter 4 Networked Militarization
Digital Depression

Dan Schiller

University of Illinois Press

This chapter examines the rise of networked militarization in the United States. It considers how increased spending for U.S. military procurement sparked a shift into networks in capitalist development, casting digital capitalism as a permanent, pervasively militarized social formation. It shows that, throughout every presidency from the Truman administration to Ronald Reagan and beyond, the United States did its best to capture and to reorganize the frontiers of the world political economy to serve capital's short- and/or long-term designs. It argues that a militarized digital capitalism carried forward capital's longstanding structural reliance on government spending, extending and reorienting it. Finally, it describes how massive and compounding investments in computer networks became a marked feature across the length and breadth of the political economy.

Keywords:   networked militarization, U.S. military, networks, digital capitalism, Ronald Reagan, capital, military procurement, computer networks

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