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Digital DepressionInformation Technology and Economic Crisis$
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Dan Schiller

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038761

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038761.001.0001

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Growth amid Depression?

Growth amid Depression?

Chapter:
(p.142) Chapter 9 Growth amid Depression?
Source:
Digital Depression
Author(s):

Dan Schiller

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038761.003.0009

This chapter examines whether the metamorphosis of communications around internet commodity chains contributed to economic growth or led to a further episode of crisis. More specifically, it considers whether the U.S. information and communications industry, which invested more in information and communications technology (ICT) and software than any other sector including banking and manufacturing, signified that a basis was being laid for market expansion and economic growth. It also discusses whether investment in Web communications commodity chains siphoned revenue and profit mostly from old to new media, so that growth overall remained flat. Finally, it highlights shifts in the territorial profile of communications markets that reflected the ongoing and unfinished historical mutation into digital capitalism.

Keywords:   commodity chains, economic growth, information industry, communications technology, software, revenue, profit, digital capitalism, internet

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