Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cannibal WritesEating Others in Caribbean and Indian Ocean Women's Writing$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Njeri Githire

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038785

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038785.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 January 2018

Cannibal Love

Cannibal Love

Ideologies of Power, Gender, and the Erotics of Eating

Chapter:
(p.31) 1 Cannibal Love
Source:
Cannibal Writes
Author(s):

Njeri Githire

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038785.003.0002

This chapter examines the juxtaposition of cannibalism and sexual appetites in Maryse Condé's Histoire de la femme cannibale (hereinafter referred to as Story, reflecting the 2007 English translation) and Andrea Levy's Small Island (2004). It argues that while the ideologically fraught figure of the cannibal has long offered a fertile ground on which to construct a counter-hegemonic aesthetic of Caribbean discourses, few if any writers explore the equation between two major constructs—the sexual and alimentary transgressions—that define the cannibal. Story and Small Island evidence that (post)imperial panics have consistently framed a range of (post)colonial conflicts in the vocabulary of alimentary and sexual deviance as a ploy to mask these very same appetites in the (neo)imperial venture. In Small Island, cannibalism is a hidden theme that lurks beneath the surface of seemingly mundane and insignificant moments of encounter. In Story, Condé deconstructs the presumed benevolence of France toward Guadeloupe through an astute critique of the dominant imagery of France as mother who nurtures and sustains her children.

Keywords:   Maryse Condé, Histoire de la femme cannibale, Andrea Levy, Small Island, cannibalism, sexual appetite, alimentary deviance

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.