Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Becoming Julia de BurgosThe Making of a Puerto Rican Icon$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Vanessa Pérez Rosario

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038969

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038969.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 October 2018

Nadie es profeta en su tierra

Nadie es profeta en su tierra

Exile, Migration, and Hemispheric Identity

Chapter:
(p.46) 2 Nadie es profeta en su tierra
Source:
Becoming Julia de Burgos
Author(s):

Vanessa Pérez Rosario

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038969.003.0003

This chapter examines Burgos's migratory routes from Puerto Rico to Havana and New York by looking at her second and third poetry collections—Canción de la verdad sencilla (Song of the Simple Truth, 1939) and El mar y tú (The Sea and You, 1954)—as well as her little-studied letters to her sister. The poetry collections and letters reveal her conflicted relationship to Puerto Rico. Despite her patriotism, home and nation became limiting, restrictive, and repressive spaces. As such, Burgos attempted to create a home and a life for herself beyond the boundaries of the nation. The chapter then discusses and extends the term sexile, usually used to describe queer migration, to heterosexual women whose sexuality appears excessive in Caribbean morality, contributing to their departure from the island.

Keywords:   Puerto Rico, migration, sexile, queer migration, sexuality

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.