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Making the News PopularMobilizing U.S. News Audiences$
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Anthony M. Nadler

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040146

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040146.001.0001

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Bringing Marketing into the Newsroom

Bringing Marketing into the Newsroom

U.S. Newspapers and the Market-Driven Journalism Movement

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter 2 Bringing Marketing into the Newsroom
Source:
Making the News Popular
Author(s):

Anthony M. Nadler

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040146.003.0003

This chapter explores the “market-driven news” movement that began to spread throughout the newspaper industry in the late 1970s. By reviewing accounts of the movement from journalists and researchers and in trade journals such as Presstime and Editor and Publisher, the chapter reconstructs how the market-driven newspaper movement took form as a culture of production that had a wide-ranging influence on U.S. news. Industry leaders felt that newspapers had to undergo a fundamental shift in their editorial philosophy—that newspapers could no longer define and prioritize news solely based on the professional judgment of editors and journalists. Instead, they proposed that papers needed to reimagine their role as servants not to an abstract public interest, but to their readers' professed interests and desires.

Keywords:   market-driven news, newspaper industry, Presstime, Editor and Publisher, U.S. news, editorial philosophy, public interests

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