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ConnexionsHistories of Race and Sex in North America$
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Jennifer Brier, Jim Downs, and Jennifer L. Morgan

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040399

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040399.001.0001

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Mapping Sex, Race, and Gender in the Corps of Discovery Expedition

Mapping Sex, Race, and Gender in the Corps of Discovery Expedition

Chapter:
(p.203) Chapter 9 Mapping Sex, Race, and Gender in the Corps of Discovery Expedition
Source:
Connexions
Author(s):

Wanda S. Pillow

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040399.003.0009

This chapter raises the question of what becomes visible when we center gender, race, colonialism, and sex as the animating forces in the telling of Lewis and Clark's famous expedition. It narrates the fateful journey from the perspective of Sacajawea, the Indian woman, and York, the enslaved man, placing both of them alongside reproductions of sexual stories of the Corps—primarily stories proliferated in the late twentieth century. In taking this approach, the chapter also scrutinizes the construction of the archive, considering how the representation of York and Sacajawea in the sources illustrates a case of both invisibility and hypervisibility.

Keywords:   Corps of Discovery Expedition, Sacajawea, York, gender, race, sex, colonialism, invisibility, hypervisibility, archive

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