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The Third SectorCommunity Organizations, NGOs, and Nonprofits$
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Meghan Elizabeth Kallman and Terry Nichols Clark

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040436

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040436.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Democratic Governance and Institutional Logics within the Third Sector (or, How Habermas Discovered the Coffee House)

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Third Sector
Author(s):

Meghan Elizabeth Kallman

Terry Nichols Clark

Cary Wu

Jean Yen-Chun Lin

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040436.003.0001

This book studies third sectors in different parts of the world. The third sector refers to various types of relief and welfare organizations, innovation organizations, public service organizations, economic development organizations, grassroots mobilization groups, advocacy groups, and social networks. These include civil society organizations, nonprofit organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and formal and informal associations. Building on recent work on the origins, dynamics, and effects of civil society across the globe, this book compares the functions, impacts, and composition of the nonprofit sector for six countries: United States, France, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. This introduction explains the book's approach of using institutional logics to study the third sector, offers new theoretical perspectives on how different types of participation can increase generalized trust and state legitimacy, and considers the impact of neoliberalism and the so-called “New Political Culture” on nonprofits. It also discusses the emergence of New Social Movements and how associational politics might fit into the large picture of political life.

Keywords:   third sector, civil society, nonprofit organizations, New Social Movements, institutional logics, generalized trust, state legitimacy, neoliberalism, New Political Culture, associational politics

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