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Alfred Bester$
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Jad Smith

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040634

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040634.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.179) Conclusion
Source:
Alfred Bester
Author(s):

Jad Smith

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040634.003.0008

Bester’s writable approach, which took shape early in his career and peaked in the fifties, resulted in open texts with layered, incongruous meanings that invited readers to coproduce, even finish, his stories through active imagination. Bester produced this sense of excess through various types of pulp-modernist extra-coding—allusions, nonstandard orthography, synesthesia, and mixed-viewpoint narration, to name a few—but the reader-centered, writable patterns he created mattered more than any of these pyrotechnics alone. The conclusion argues that Bester is rightly remembered as a lodestar for SF’s venturers and nomads, largely because his self-conscious play with SF reading and writing protocols put the field in a highly productive dialogue with itself.

Keywords:   pulp modernism, outsider effect, Barry N. Malzberg, John W. Campbell, bricolage, pastiche, Theodore Sturgeon, Edgar Pangborn, Philip K. Dick, Robert Scheckley

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