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Baking Powder WarsThe Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking$
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Linda Civitello

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041082

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.001.0001

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The Advertising War Begins

The Advertising War Begins

“Is the Bread That We Eat Poisoned?” 1876–1888

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 4 The Advertising War Begins
Source:
Baking Powder Wars
Author(s):

Linda Civitello

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.003.0005

In the 1870s, with scores of companies jumping on the baking powder band wagon and using newspapers, magazines, and trade cards to advertise, Royal pioneered ideological warfare that claimed its competitors’ products were adulterated or poisonous. Royal also published The Royal Baker and Pastry Chef, a corporate cookbook that glorified its products and educated female consumers about them. In the West, baking powder was adopted readily by Scandinavian immigrants but was given to Native Americans on reservations to make wheat-based instead of corn-based breadstuffs as part of forced assimilation.

Keywords:   advertising, ideological warfare, trade cards, assimilation, poison, Scandinavian, corporate cookbook

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