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Baking Powder WarsThe Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking$
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Linda Civitello

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041082

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.001.0001

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The Federal Trade Commission Wars

The Federal Trade Commission Wars

The Final Federal Battle, 1920–1929

Chapter:
(p.135) Chapter 9 The Federal Trade Commission Wars
Source:
Baking Powder Wars
Author(s):

Linda Civitello

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.003.0010

Baking powder companies repeatedly attempted to use federal agencies to limit competition. Calumet’s complaint against Royal to the FTC was inconclusive because both sides presented compelling scientific evidence. At the same time, baking powder companies began actively marketing to children, and Calumet created the famous slogan, “Double Acting.” The Hulmans renamed their product “Clabber Girl,” partly to capitalize on the popularity of the New American Woman, and withstood onslaughts from the Ku Klux Klan and new chain stores. At the end of the 1920s, the trade war ended abruptly when Royal and Calumet became subsumed in food conglomerates, Standard Brands and General Foods, respectively.

Keywords:   FTC, KKK, Ku Klux Klan, New American Woman, Clabber Girl, Hulman, Calumet, Royal

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