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Baking Powder WarsThe Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking$
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Linda Civitello

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041082

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 February 2018

The Price War

The Price War

The Fight for the National Market, 1930–1950

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter 10 The Price War
Source:
Baking Powder Wars
Author(s):

Linda Civitello

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252041082.003.0011

The Depression caused a cutthroat price war that turned the baking powder industry on its head. Royal lost and never recovered, while Clabber Girl, through aggressive marketing under its new leader, Tony Hulman, became the industry frontrunner. New Deal policies changed management-labor relations and attempted to regulate businesses in unprecedented ways. Housewives rejoiced in new baking powder products like Bisquick and Jiffy but continued to struggle with baking powder chaos in cookbooks, especially the new Joy of Cooking and racist cookbooks spawned by Gone with the Wind. World War II continued the trend toward purchasing baked goods out of the home.

Keywords:   price war, Tony Hulman, Clabber Girl, New Deal, WWII, Joy of Cooking, Bisquick, Jiffy, Gone with the Wind

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