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The Latina/o Midwest Reader$
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Omar Valerio-Jiménez, Santiago R. Vaquera-Vásquez, and Claire F. Fox

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041211

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041211.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use (for details see www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 October 2018

Latina/o Studies and Ethnic Studies in the Midwest

Latina/o Studies and Ethnic Studies in the Midwest

Chapter:
(p.156) Latina/o Studies and Ethnic Studies in the Midwest
Source:
The Latina/o Midwest Reader
Author(s):

Amelia María De La Luz Montes

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041211.003.0010

This chapter describes several challenges faced by Latina/o Studies and Ethnic Studies at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, including shrinking humanities requirements and adequate office space. By combining memoir and critical analysis, the essay provides a personal and critical account of the coordinated efforts of faculty and students to successfully protest an administrative decision to relocate various interdisciplinary programs to a condemned building. The organizing efforts succeeded because faculty and students mobilized to defend interdisciplinary programs, and then met with the university administrators to explain how their office space was vital to their educational effectiveness. The chapter also discusses the educational challenges posed by the Midwest “personality,” often described as Nebraska “nice” or Minnesota “nice,” which urges emotional self-restraint, politeness, and conformity, but also discourages agency, activism, and independence.

Keywords:   Latina/o studies, ethnic studies, student activism, transparency, inclusion, faculty governance, Nebraska “nice,” academic freedom, higher education, agency

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