Page of

The Justices of the Vinson Court, Douds, and the Start of the Court’s McCarthy Era

The Justices of the Vinson Court, Douds, and the Start of the Court’s McCarthy Era

(October Term 1949)

Chapter:
(p.24) 2 The Justices of the Vinson Court, Douds, and the Start of the Court’s McCarthy Era
Source:
The Supreme Court and McCarthy-Era Repression
Author(s):
Robert M. Lichtman
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037009.003.0002

This chapter discusses the U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions during its October 1949 term. The Court convened for its new term on Monday, October 3, 1949. The beginnings of what would soon be a heavy flow of “Communist” cases either awaited action by the Court or was in the pipeline. Douds was the term’s most important decision. Section 9(h) of the Taft–Hartley Act, assertedly aimed at preventing “political strikes” by Communist-dominated unions, made it next to impossible for American Communist Party (CPUSA) members to hold union office. A six-justice Court, in an opinion by Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson, upheld this provision against a claim that it infringed the First Amendment rights of union officers. The Court found that Congress’ power to regulate interstate commerce authorized it to prevent “political strikes” and that it “could rationally find” that the CPUSA, unlike other political parties, used union leadership positions to obstruct commerce for “political advantage.”

Keywords:   Taft–Hartley Act, non-Communist affidavit, U.S. Supreme Court, McCarthy era, Fred M. Vinson, union officers, First Amendment rights, American Community Party

Sign In

Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy and Legal Notice