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Becoming Ray Bradbury$
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Jonathan R. Eller

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036293

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.001.0001

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Broadening Horizons

Broadening Horizons

Chapter:
(p.198) 33 Broadening Horizons
Source:
Becoming Ray Bradbury
Author(s):

Jonathan R. Eller

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036293.003.0034

This chapter examines Ray Bradbury's professional and personal milestones that followed the crisis of 1949 involving The Illustrated Man. The insights that emerged from Bradbury's April 1949 exchange of letters with Don Congdon renewed the writer's confidence in his submissions. Since then, he worked with Congdon ever more closely to have his Green Town stories, science fiction tales, and fantasies get through the offices of the mainstream magazine editors. By June 1949, Congdon had at least eighteen active story files. This chapter discusses memorable moments in Bradbury's life and career in 1949, including his interaction with UCLA's writing group; his lectures on writing; and his meeting with Theodore Sturgeon and Walter Bradbury. It also considers Bradbury's readings during the period and concludes by noting the transformation of his concept of a Martian story collection into a unified work more in line with Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio.

Keywords:   writing, Ray Bradbury, Don Congdon, Green Town stories, science fiction, Theodore Sturgeon, Walter Bradbury, reading, The Illustrated Man

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