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The Beautiful Music All Around UsField Recordings and the American Experience$
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Stephen Wade

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252036880

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252036880.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

Pete Steele

Pete Steele

It’s What Folks Do

Chapter:
(p.207) 8 Pete Steele
Source:
The Beautiful Music All Around Us
Author(s):

Stephen Wade

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252036880.003.0008

This chapter describes the recordings of banjoist Pete Steele, who began as a coal miner and then became a carpenter in a southern Ohio paper plant. On March 29, 1938, at his company-owned home on Rhea Avenue a few blocks from the Champion paper mills, Pete Steele first recorded “Coal Creek March” along with twenty-six other songs and tunes. Pete's facility with multiple tunings, combined with his various right-hand picking styles, demonstrates a technical range unsurpassed on the Folk Archive's numerous other disc-era banjo recordings. Surrounded by his wife Lillie and their children, Pete applied these skills either solo or to accompany Lillie, who additionally sang four numbers by herself. Their son Craig joined them on three pieces, playing guitar and sometimes adding his voice to theirs.

Keywords:   banjoist, banjo, musicians, Pete Steele, Library of Congress recordings, Coal Creek March

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