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The Black Chicago Renaissance$
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Darlene Clark Hine and John McCluskey Jr.

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037023

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037023.001.0001

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Richard Wright and the Season of Manifestoes

Richard Wright and the Season of Manifestoes

Chapter:
(p.96) Chapter 6 Richard Wright and the Season of Manifestoes
Source:
The Black Chicago Renaissance
Author(s):

John McCluskey

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037023.003.0006

This chapter studies the significance of the timing of Richard Wright's “Blueprint for Writing” and its applications to his nonfiction work, specifically his early journalism and work as a journal editor. The chapter places Wright's piece among the earliest in an international flurry of black diaspora manifestoes articulating generational and language disruptions. This is especially the case for Haitian and other francophone writers whom Wright would join in Paris by 1947. In their attempt to resist American oppression and French colonialism, nearly all called upon a return to embrace folklore, traditional expressive culture, and the complexity of their own history. Wright internationalizes the Chicago impulses coursing through the literary thought of his generation throughout the African diaspora.

Keywords:   Richard Wright, Blueprint for Writing, journalism, black diaspora manifestoes, Haitian writers, francophone writers, American oppression, French colonialism, African diaspora

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