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Quaker BrotherhoodInterracial Activism and the American Friends Service Committee, 1917-1950$
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Allan W. Austin

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037047

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037047.001.0001

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“Intelligent Leadership in the Cause of Racial Brotherhood”

“Intelligent Leadership in the Cause of Racial Brotherhood”

Quakers, Social Science, and the AFSC’s Interracial Activism in the 1930s

Chapter:
(p.81) 3. “Intelligent Leadership in the Cause of Racial Brotherhood”
Source:
Quaker Brotherhood
Author(s):

Allan W. Austin

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037047.003.0004

This chapter introduces the annual Institute of Race Relations (IRR). The institute recruited many prominent scholars of race and ethnicity, offering individual students, both Quakers and non-Quakers, the opportunity to study race in the classroom and then apply their newfound understandings outside it. While the first two institutes had a secular orientation, by the mid-1930s Friends consciously attempted to make the scholarly work of the institute theologically relevant for themselves. While earlier AFSC projects had attacked racism as an individual problem, Quakers in the Service Committee emerged from the Institute of Race Relations with a broader understanding of systemic problems that had to be engaged, too.

Keywords:   Institute of Race Relations, social science, scholarly methods, societal reforms, education, IRR

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