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Advertising at WarBusiness, Consumers, and Government in the 1940s$
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Inger L. Stole

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037122

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037122.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

The Consumer Movement’s Return

The Consumer Movement’s Return

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 The Consumer Movement’s Return
Source:
Advertising at War
Author(s):

Inger L. Stole

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037122.003.0005

This chapter focuses on the concerns of Consumers Union (CU) about the mutually beneficial relationship between advertisers and Washington, including CU cofounder Colston Warne’s attempts to gain publicity and public traction for his crusade. It also examines the renewed interest in grading and standardization of consumer goods due to war conditions, and how the measure was as welcomed in activist circles as it was opposed in the advertising community. The core idea for the standardization of consumer goods had been rekindled as part of the government’s TNEC investigation and continued to linger as an issue throughout the war. Likewise, the changed economic situation brought on by the war again called the economic function of advertising into question and gave its critics new credence.

Keywords:   Consumers Union, Colston Warne, consumer goods, adertising community, war conditions, TNEC

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